Kenyon’s Events

October 1, 2008 7PM.
Moderated by Kenyon Farrow
Sponsored by the Brecht Forum, Red Bone Press, and Audre Lorde Project
85 South Oxford, Fort Greene, Brooklyn, NY.
September 11, 2008 630-9pm
Were you BORN this way? Does it Matter?
JOIN US to explore whether science and public health attempts to explain “queer” identity will help LGBTQ movements for justice, or will they do more harm than good.
Confirmed panelists include:
Jaime Grant, National Lesbian & Gay Task Force Policy Institute
Sel J. Hwahng, National Development & Research Institutes
Nancy Ordover, “American Eugenics: Race, Queer Anatomy & the Science of Nationalism”
Rebecca Young, Ass’t Professor, of Women’s Studies, Barnard College
Moderated by Kenyon Farrow, QEJ

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center
208 West 13th Street (Between 7th & 8th Avenues), New York, NY

Free and Open to the Public | Refreshments will be served

May 2, 2008. All Day (My panel is roughly from 10am-1230pm).

The Millions More Movement, Cosby’s ‘call-outs,’ and other recent trends renew an old approach to black political thought and practice. The racial uplift tradition tries to improve the conditions of black life by insisting on moral refinement and race-based organization. Uplift ideology and practice have a long and storied past, but critics of the tradition worry over its limitations. Some express concern that it is anti-democratic, intolerant, elitist, sexist, and heterosexist. Others think it focuses too much on personal morality and cultural pathology and not enough on social justice and political economy.

The participants in the ‘Stand Up!’ symposium will think through the risks and rewards of this new racial uplift politics. This interdisciplinary exercise in public philosophy will explore the implications of a social phenomenon with broad ethical significance. The new politics of racial uplift emerges from a widely shared conviction that something is deeply wrong in American society. Our public philosophy conference will take this judgment seriously, and subject this politics to searching and critical scrutiny.

The symposium is free and open to the public.

April 22, 2008. 6:30PM
GENDA and OUR COMMUNITIES: a forum
Learn more about GENDA, a bill to outlaw discrimination based on gender identity and expression in New York State. Topics include background on GENDA, how it relates to other pressing issues faced by our LGBTQ communities, and how you can get involved. Tuesday, April 22nd 6:30-8:30pm at the LGBT Community Center, 208 West 13th St. New York, NY 10011. For more information contact: Gretchen Cohoon at 212.620.7310 or gcohoon@gaycenter.org
April4-6

Economic Justice in the US

Moderator: Kenyon Farrow

Speakers: Alyssa Best, Sadie Crabtree, Shana Griffin

HIV/AIDS: The Urgent Need for Action

Moderator: Kenyon Farrow

Speakers: Helen Kanu, Juanita Williams, Tim Horn
March 29, 2008
12pm-1:30pm
Swarthmore, PA, SWARTHMORE College
Sager Symposium
Lecture: “Dancing with Death: Black Queer Identities and Popular Music in the age of HIV/AIDS.”
(Scheuer Room, Kohlberg Hall)
500 College Avenue
Swarthmore PA, 19081
Tuesday, March 25th, 2008
6:00pm to 9:00pm

LGBT Center, Room 301
208 West 13th Street
NYC, 10011
The Human Right to Health: Universal Health Care and Sexual and Reproductive Rights
Panelists will discuss what is meant by “universal health care,” health care as a human right, LGBT, and particularly transgender, health issues and barriers to health care access, reproductive health care, and universal health care within the context of the Presidential election.Confirmed speakers include:
Kenyon Farrow, Director of Communications, Community HIV/AIDS Mobilization Project (CHAMP)
Marilyn Clement, National Coordinator, Healthcare-NOW!
Nathan Leavitt, Community Education Coordinator, Callen-Lorde Community Health Center
Joseph Defilippis, Executive Director, Queers for Economic Justice (QEJ)
Anja Rudiger, Human Right to Health Program Director, National Economic and Social Rights Initiative (NESRI)/ National Health Law Program

7 thoughts on “Kenyon’s Events

  1. Mr. forrow i appreciate ur consern and power is everything i believe or now i believe. my life die a year ago and im still lost from. getting help from a pastor to getting help from a psycologist. thats what the killer is putting me threw me and poncho has faught in arguements for two years and never did i leave his side and now hese in heaven and he wont leave mine i just wich we as friends spoke more i stop talking to poncho i just wich i didnt.. so if people are reading this please learn from this message we are not ignorant we just do stupid things but we learn from them. stop the violents.

    I fresh stylz did

  2. Kenyon,
    I can’t find your email address for some reason this minute, and just wanted to thank you for facilitating the Masculinities panel at the reprojustice conference this weekend. I really enjoyed the way you pulled it together, and it was just nice to get to share that space with you. Thanks for continually inspiring me. Dean

  3. Hi Kenyon

    I am a producer at KPFA radio in Berkeley, Ca. I am doing a piece on Prop 8 and some of the critiques Richard Kim and Lisa Duggan and others have brought up on it , and the gay marriage movement and particularly the response by some to Prop 8 in terms of race, what happened with the outreach into communities of color , what went right and wrong and how this is being framed now. I would love to have you be part of this discussion with Lisa Duggan . We have scheduled an interview for this Thursday at 6pm Pacific time.

    are you interested in participating ?

    thanks

    Lisa Dettmer
    Women’s Magazine
    KPFA Radio
    Berkeley, CA 94704
    510-407-4790

  4. Mr. Farrow, I would really like to get to know more about your work ing the Black gay community. I can’t stand Keith Boykin with his pompus, arrogant ass. I hope you’re nothing like him.

  5. Dear Kenyon: We hope you will post the following:

    Are you a Black gay male with a Rhode Island connection? Do you work, live, or were you born there? Black Lavender 2 is a landmark project documenting the lives of Black gay men in Rhode Island. If you are interested in being interviewed for this project, or know someone who is, please contact Daniel Scott at: dscott@ric.edu

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